The new year.

Hey!  Busy, busy, busy.  I’m determined to get more posts out, though.  Lately I’ve been working like a madman and sleeping very little.  The weeks fly by and I find myself nearly into the second month of 2016 already, with no real recollection of what happened to the month of January.  I still find myself thinking of what I’m going to accomplish in the new year, and then realizing I’m well into it.  Accomplish I have, though!  Most excitingly, the printing (finally) of issue #3 of Father Robot.  I’ve been waiting for the publisher to put out the digital version, to no avail.  I have no idea what’s going on there…

Anyway, in the spirit of all things FR, here’s a sketch from way-back in the development days of the series.  I don’t know why he has no arm.

FR_sketch_04

I’ve got to get back to work, but I hope you enjoy the drawing and please feel free to drop me a line here or at sam@samgarlandillustrations… especially if you’d like to acquire a copy of the new issue!

Being out of it.

LoaP_preview_2

Sometimes I feel like I’ve been dosed.  It’s been an unbelievably busy Fall for me.  I rarely sleep enough.  I feel like I’ve accomplished a lot and I’ve been productive.  The above image is from a comic commission that’s been keeping me pretty busy.  I prefer to be drawing robots and spaceships, and drawing panel after panel of emotional people in rather drab hospital environments has been a real challenge!  I learned a lot, though, and made some headway in keeping character consistency, which is much easier to do with robots…

Anyway, the story for the above illustration can be a real downer at times, and it was made more emotional by talking to some of the actual people the story is written around.  I was tempted to make an alternate ending where a giant mech bursts in and saves the day.  Maybe later…

 

What I’ve been doing:

LetteringMaster

No, not the above, but sometimes I feel like it.  I know, I  know.  I haven’t posted in a while.  It’s been a fairly insane year for me.  I’ve moved three times, started a new (day) job, and become truly single for the first time in 17 years… life is different now!  I love it, though.  I’ve found myself drawing more than I have since grad school, my freelance client base has increased, and dating in one’s late 30’s is a lot more fun than I would have thought… if kind of weird.  Anyway, things are working out for the best.

I’m going to go ahead and promise to post more about more artwork from here on out.  Thanks for checking out this blog, and stay tuned for more…

I miss Seattle.

That’s it, pretty much.  The title kind of says it all.  I’ve sort of settled in Oklahoma City now.  I have a day job that takes pretty much all of my waking hours during the week and the freelance work takes up the rest of it.  From too little work to too much.  Ugh.  I miss rainy days and mellow liberals.  Does Seattle miss me?

Seattle

To the rescue.

Just when you thought I was down for the count, here I am again, stronger than ever.  These words are brought to you by the following superhero, who I worked-up from a rejected commission sketch recently:

my_superhero_1

It’s been a busy month, relocating myself and business to Oklahoma City.  I haven’t lived in this part of the country for 20 years, and it’s been a little readjustment.  I don’t mean that sarcastically, it’s only taken a small amount of effort to be comfortable here.  It helps when there’s family nearby (I was born and raised not too from from here) and when the culture is a familiar and welcoming one.  This area seems to be exploding right now, but it’s still incredibly affordable and roomy compared to the cities I’ve lived in on the West Coast.

All that aside, the freelance work has really picked up and I’ve had to hurry to keep pace.  When combined with a new day job, I’m all-of-a-sudden out of the free time I’ve been enjoying for the past 8 or 9 months.  So, enjoy this little piece I did last night, while a bout of insomnia had hold of me.  I’ll post more as they sneak their way out.

Time for reflection

I was trying to come up with a new profile image for myself.  This sketch was done with pencil, and while it’s not an inaccurate likeness, I’m not happy enough to use it for my new representation on various social media sites.  Oh well.  I’ll keep trying.

Sam

Shades of gray.

Throughout the 80’s, Hayao Miyazaki created a comic called Nausicaä.  I didn’t discover the series until about 10 years ago, but I was blown away by the style it was done in.  There was a lot of hashing instead of solid blacks (for shading) and everything was done in a kind of loose, organic line work.  It created such a unique feel for everything, and really even created a mood for the whole world.  I feel like these 3-value drawings of Father Robot I’ve done in the past couple of days remind me of how Nausicaä made me feel back when I first read it.  Not that it’s in the same style or anywhere near as well-rendered, but I do like how this has come out.

FRx6

Again, this was done with Copic technical pens and sketch markers.  I got a little more variation in value by blending the markers together when I could.

How I learned to love a robot.

Someone asked me at the last comic convention my process for creating drawings.  At the time I was working on commissions I had received at that event, which could be anything from superheroes to caricatures of the attendee, but normally they were good ol’ robots.  This is what happened when both your table banners feature giant robots.  At the table, I work a lot faster than I do in my studio and erase all my pencil lines, but I thought I’d share my ideal process, when I have more time and all my gear, here for you all.  So, let’s start at the end.  Then, scroll down and I’ll lay out the process a little but more. Here’s the end-product, a hand-drawn bust of Father Robot with value (shading):

FRx4

To get to this, I first lay down a bunch of wild sketches with light blue (non-photo) pencils.  Because I am an extremely messy sketcher, I prefer a very light pencil that erases completely.  Some brands are very greasy and, even if used lightly, don’t erase very easily.  This is important if you plan to “color” directly on the original drawing later.  This pencil lines need to be able to be removed, or maybe I just want to be able to correct the shape with an eraser.  I prefer Prismacolor Col-Erase pencils.  It ends up being very vague and light:

FRx1

Then I come back with either a soft, dark lead either in normal gray/black graphite or a drake color of blue.  I like art pencils, but any ol’ pencil will do, preferably (for me) 2B or harder.  While traveling, I carry mechanical pencils with me, with a variety of leads preloaded.  With the right tool in-hand, I render a clearer drawing that’s going to be pretty close to the product I want to end up with:

FRx2

After that, I can draw right over the top on the pencil lines with ink.  Sometimes the paper won’t take the ink if the pencil was to greasy or too much drawing was done.  So, I can just lay a piece of tracing paper, vellum, or, in this case, marker paper over the sketch and draw clean, inked, line work.  This process is also good if I want to make multiple drawings from one sketch or I know there’s something I want to fix in the composition.  Here’s the result with Copic technical pens on some Bienfang Graphics 360 marker paper:

FRx3

As you can see, I wanted to turn the eyes a bit and feel free to sketch some more details of the neck and the body around the head, but for the most part it retains the point of the original sketch.  Then I get out my Copic markers and just have fun.  When I’m at conventions, I try to bring at least a dozen different values with me to do commissions, but on this, non-con, trip I’m on currently, I only carried three values, or shades, with me.  I can compensate for this lack of variety by working fast and laying down, then blending, two values together with the pigment is still wet.  I think I got a pretty good result!  Here it is again:

FRx4

That’s about it.  If I work fast, I can get a piece like this done in a little over half an hour.  I spent more time on that for this one because no one was waiting for it.  Hope you enjoy a little peak into my work process!

More good times with Father Robot.

I did some drawings of Father Robot’s head yesterday and, after I finished, I decided that I liked one for a new profile pic of FR’s Facebook page.  It’s nice to feel “back in the saddle” with this book.  I think I’ve had some real hang-ups about finishing the series, but even doing a couple of little drawings of this big lug have made me realize how much I like him.  So, look forward to lots more of this kooky automaton and enjoy this image.

FR head 2

I drew the line work traditionally, with Copic technical pens, but cleaned it up in Photoshop and Illustrator.  The coloring was all done in Photoshop, using my buddy‘s Cintique (it was my first time to use one for coloring!)  Of course, all lettering is done in Illustrator.

Remember this guy?

Just warming up with a little Father Robot today.  I miss this guy!

I forget how hard he can actually be do draw.  When I designed him it was from some very static poses, which I was able to set up with some profiles and shapes I found very pleasing.  Twisting and turning him all around, though, makes some problems for me.  I always preferred him without his rocket-launching backpack.  So, this is a little variation on the robot you see in my comic, with some new shoulder patches and forearm cannon as well.

FRnew

This was done the old-fashioned way, with technical (Copic) pens on paper.

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